ABOUT US
About Malta
History of Malta
Historical Places
Embassys
Diving
Historical Places

 

St John's Co-Cathedral

City/Region:
Malta
Valletta's magnificent medieval cathedral is famous for the painting by Caravaggio, which hangs in its oratory, and the 369 inlaid mosaic marble tombstones that cover its floor. Each tombstone depicts the lives of the Grand Masters of the Order of St John, buried beneath. The façade is rather severe and militaristic, but inside the cathedral is lavishly splendid in the grandest tradition of high Baroque, with every inch of wall covered by carving, while the vaulted ceiling sports paintings depicting the life of St John the Baptist, patron saint of the Knights.
Address:
St JohnStreetValletta

                                      

Palace of the Grand Master

City/Region:
Malta
The Grand Master's palace, built around 1571, today serves as the office of the President and seat of the Maltese Parliament. The palace is a treasure house of art, from the unique collection of Gobelin Tapestries to frescoes depicting the Great Siege of 1565 by Perez d'Aleccio that cover the walls of the Halls of St Michael and St George. Visitors can also view the armory and state apartments, which are adorned with friezes describing the history of the Order of
St John.
Address: Republic Street,
Valletta

                                         

National
Museum of Archaeology

City/Region:Malta
The archaeological museum on Republic Street is housed in one of the inns of the Knights of St John, the Auberge de Provence. The museum's focus on
Malta's prehistory includes displays such as the reconstruction of prehistoric remains found at Hypogeum. Items such as pottery, sculptures, statuettes, stone implements and jewelry from the prehistoric, megalithic and temple-building periods are featured, as well as some Punic and Roman tomb furniture. All the exhibits were found on excavations across the Maltese islands.
Address: Charles Borg, Auberge de Provence, Republic Street, Valletta
Website: www.heritagemalta.org

                                              

Lascaris War Rooms

City/Region: Malta
Valletta suffered a great deal of damage during bombing raids in the Second World War. The Battle of Malta and other events involving the islands during the early years of the war are featured in a series of 17th century tunnels, which were turned into a military operations complex during the war. The complex has been restored and now acts as a museum, with charts, models and dioramas.
Address: Lascaris Ditch, Valletta

                                          

Malta Experience

City/Region: Malta
A dramatic presentation that illustrates the history of Malta, from Neolithic to modern times, can be enjoyed at the Mediterranean Conference Center at St. Elmo's bastion in Valletta. This building itself has been impressively restored, having been built by the Knights in the 1500s as a hospital. The wards, which are great sweeping halls with vaulted ceilings and marble floors, now serve as exhibition areas. A modern theater has been added where the Malta Experience audio-visual show is offered in 10 languages.
Address:
MediterraneanConferenceCenter, Mediterranean Street, Valletta
Website: www.themaltaexperience.com

Mdina

City/Region: Malta
Mdina, known as the noble city, was the original capital of
Malta before the arrival of the Knights of St John in the middle ages. It was originally a Phoenician town but spent periods under Roman, Arabic and Norman occupation. The elegant walled city, with its suburb, Rabat, can trace its origins back more than 4,000 years, although today all that remains is the medieval town, which has been largely restored. It is situated on a rocky outcrop about nine miles (15km) west of Valletta. At the heart of Mdina is its landmark Baroque Cathedral of St Paul. Mdina has a conservative atmosphere, in keeping with its noble past. While the Knights reigned over Malta the city became the home of the Maltese nobility, who lived there under autonomous rule, not being deemed worthy to be invited to join the Order of St John. The descendants of some of these families live here still. Mdina and Rabat not only offer some fascinating and valuable sightseeing opportunities, but the old city is particularly inviting at night when it is lamplit and visitors can enjoy the ambience of restaurants tucked away in its bastions and palace courtyards. Motor vehicles are off-limits inside the city walls, and pedestrians have free reign to walk the streets and take in a glimpse of life in the middle ages.

Three Cities

City/Region: Malta
Malta's main maritime towns have merged into a fortified conglomerate known as the Three Cities, resting on the promontories opposite Valletta. Walking tours of the area are popular. Vittoriosa is the oldest town in Malta after Mdina. It features plenty of historical architecture, including several of the Inns of the Knights of St John, as well as a hospital built by the Order in 1672, which is still a Benedictine convent inhabited by devout nuns. Fort St Angelo, the oldest fortified part of Vittoriosa dating from 1274, stands at the tip of the promontory, and the Museum of Maritime History is also well worth a visit. The youngest of the Three Cities, Cospicua, dates from 1717 and features some interesting churches, while Senglea, designed by Grandmaster De La Sengle in 1551, is an important place of pilgrimage. Senglea's parish church contains a statue of Christ the Redeemer that is said to have miraculous powers.

Hypogeum


City/Region:
Malta
The Hypogeum, just southwest of the Three Cities in the suburb of Paolo, is a labyrinthine complex of man-made chambers hewn out of limestone, extending about 36ft (11m) below the surface. Experts believe it was used as a burial site and temple by Neolithic man, who used antlers and stone picks to carve out the labyrinth in semi-darkness nearly 5,000 years ago. The site has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage site. Archaeologists have recovered numerous statues, amulets, figurines and vases, many of which are on display in the
ArchaeologyMuseum in Valletta.
Address:
Burial Street, Paola
Website: www.heritagemalta.org www.heritagemaltashop.com


St Mary's Church, Mosta


City/Region:
Malta
The center of every Maltese town and village is occupied by a beautiful church. One of the largest in
Europe is St Mary's in the central Maltese town of Mosta, with its glorious blue, gold and white dome. The church is regarded as having been the site of a World War II miracle: in 1942 while 300 people were praying in the church a bomb penetrated the dome and landed on the mosaic floor, but did not explode. A replica of the bomb is today displayed in the church sacristy.
Address:
Rotunda Square, Mosta

                                      

Hagar Qim

City/Region: Malta
The prehistoric temple complex discovered in 1839 at Hagar Qim in western
Malta dates from about 3,800 BC, and has the oldest known human structures in the world. The Hagar Qim and nearby Mnajdra ruins are close to the village of Qrendi, about nine miles (15km) southwest of Valletta. The megalithic temple complex carved from giant limestone slabs is adorned with carved animals and idols, sacrificial altars and oracular chambers, all fashioned with flint and obsidian tools. The largest megalith is 23ft (7m) high and weighs about 20 tons. Many of the relics recovered from the site, including the famous 'fat lady' statues, are on display in the National Museum of Archaeology in Valletta.
Address: West of the
village of Qrendi
Website:
www.heritagemalta.org

Museum of Archaeology

City/Region: Gozo
A good place to begin exploring Gozo is at the
Museum of Archaeology, found just inside the walls of the Citadel in Victoria behind the Old Gate, in a 17th century building that was originally the Town Hall. The museum illustrates the cultural history of Gozo from prehistoric times to the early modern era, presented chronologically from the Neolithic and TemplePeriod onwards through the Phoenician, Roman, Medieval and Knights of St John periods.
Address: Triq Bieb l-Imdina, The Citadel
Website: www.heritagemalta.org